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Blog

Filtering by Tag: children

Festivalling with the little moppets

Sophie Lombardi

Not been to a festival since your free and single days in the 90's? Neither had I. Let me tell you, taking the kids is a whole different ball game. I'm no Edith Bowman, but I have talked to my family festy friends and we've come up with some tips....

The Tent

Back in the day, you were all too pissed to get the tent up, so you slept underneath the ground sheet and it was surprisingly comfortable. We are terrible campers but the only camp craft you need at a festival is to be able to put the tent up. To avoid divorce proceedings, attempt this at home first and put it up immediately on arrival at the festival. As everyone has bought the same tent on sale at Halfords, it's a good idea to put a up a flag or something bright so you can find your tent again and the kids don't get too lost.

Food

Unlike Reading in the 90's when you lived off fags, booze and the occasional Ginsters pasty, you are going to need some real food this time around. Many of the family festivals have fancy schmancy food outlets (Fortnums at Port Eliot this year). Buying the kids aged-venison and gruyure waffles may feel like setting fire to your hard earned cash. As most festy meals cost around £8, we recommend packing a cool bag of rice cakes, peanut butter, muesli bars or whatever will keep your kids going, without having to partake in any camp craft cooking.

Sleep

The main flaw in family festivals is that the party doesn't stop until the wee hours and yet the kids are still up with the sun. Tip from the mama ravers, ear plugs for you so that you can get some kip, eye masks for the kids (put these on them after they have gone to sleep) and all the coffee in the entire world.

Planning

There's a lot of stuff for the precious moppets to do at family festivals. Some of it is free and some of it you have to pay for. To avoid meltdowns and being totally skint, look at the program with the kids beforehand and agree on a couple of things a day. You may need to book into workshops in advance.

Tired Little Leggies

It's often a long way between the different stages at festivals. Little leggies may benefit from a good robust buggy or a cart that can be rented from most festivals. You will inevitably end up carrying them at some point as well as lugging around the buggy/cart.

Other things you may want to bring along are loads of baby wipes (festival shower), head torches and ear defenders (even though our children make more noise than a death metal band).

Poppy and Honesty are going to be at Port Eliot Festival this year running workshops for big and little people. Please come and say hello and make yourself some Liberty Print Headgear.

Best tip of all, have tonnes of fun ..

Love

Sophie xxx

 

Winter Love Bomb

Sophie Lombardi

At this time of year my children become increasingly anxious that they are on the naughty list and are rather obsessed with their obscenely extravagant Christmas lists. Apparently this year FC has a budget of about 1,000 pounds per child (Wow! who knew he was so eligible?) Anyway, at this point, I start to self implode and mumble about the poor starving children which has absolutely no impact on their moral compasses whatsoever.

This year I am determined to install some kind of Christmas spirit into the entitled little rat bags  without bursting their whole sparkly Christmas bubble and spending the day ranting into my mulled wine.  Getting the children to give is quite a challenge. To be honest their contribution to the Shoe Box Appeal (choosing a toothbrush) and The Food Bank (carrying the cereal) is rather minimal. So brace yourself lucky friends and relatives, this year, the kids are making stuff for you.

We're big bath-fans in our house. It's not really about getting clean (thats just a bonus) but more about having some lovely floaty time-out. So we're making lots of fabulous multi-coloured sparkly love (bath) bombs for everyone. Embellish as you wish, rose petals, glitter, degradable confetti; all provide lots of decadent fun amidst the fizzle. Making stuff for people at Christmas is hardly original but like many parents, I become so consumed getting the festive haul together, I forget to schedule 'making time'. It's a great opportunity for kids to properly give and maybe even start to understand what Christmas all about, a giant winter love bomb (with lots of presents and some good old festive fighting). 

 

Sophie xxxxx (see Winter Love Bomb recipe below)

Recipe for Winter Love Bombs.  INGREDIENTS.  300g Bicarbonate of Soda,  100g Citric Acid  10ml Fragrance or Essential Oil of your choice (for sensitive babes use half)  Colour - most food colours are fine.   Razzamatazz- glitter, rose petals, confetti, go wild.  METHOD...  1. Brush a little olive/almond oil inside your mould (silicone ice cube trays or cup cake moulds work a treat)  2. Combine the bicarb, citric acid with food colouring and mix together with your hands.  3. Add your essential oils and mix to combine.  4. Spray a little water into the mixture, just enough so that it holds together when you squish it in the palm of your hand.  5. Add your razzamatazz (glitter, rose petals etc).  6. Push into your moulds and leave to dry out for 2-3 days.

Recipe for Winter Love Bombs.

INGREDIENTS.

300g Bicarbonate of Soda,

100g Citric Acid

10ml Fragrance or Essential Oil of your choice (for sensitive babes use half)

Colour - most food colours are fine. 

Razzamatazz- glitter, rose petals, confetti, go wild.

METHOD...

1. Brush a little olive/almond oil inside your mould (silicone ice cube trays or cup cake moulds work a treat)

2. Combine the bicarb, citric acid with food colouring and mix together with your hands.

3. Add your essential oils and mix to combine.

4. Spray a little water into the mixture, just enough so that it holds together when you squish it in the palm of your hand.

5. Add your razzamatazz (glitter, rose petals etc).

6. Push into your moulds and leave to dry out for 2-3 days.